Countdown To Oscar: Who Never Won The Oscar?

In the history of the Oscars, there are always a handful of people the masses feel are robbed of their recognition by the Academy.  This year it was Selma Director Ava DuVernay and its star David Oyelowo.  I bet you didn't know about these groundbreaking, big stars who also never got a chance to win an Oscar. Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick and Orson Welles

 

Hitchcock was nominated five times for best director and never won an Oscar.  However, was awarded the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award in 1968 (usually given to those with an outstanding body of work, but never won the coveted award).   Kubrick and Welles were nominated and won an Academy Awards in other areas.  Kubrick won a  Best Effects Oscar for 2001: A Space Odyssey and Welles won Best Original Screenplay Oscar for Citizen Kane.

Richard Burton and Peter O'Toole

Burton and O'Toole, two of the best actors in any era have a total of 15 Oscar nominations between them.  However, in 2003 O'Toole was bestowed with an Honorary Oscar.

 

Marilyn Monroe

One of the most iconic imitated movie stars of all time, Marilyn Monroe, changed the game for women in the Golden Age of Hollywood.  Monroe was an amazing actress, but the Academy overlooked her talent due to her sex symbol status.

Marilyn monroe

Marilyn monroe

Cary Grant

Grant starred in over 70 films, garnered 2 nominations, but the golden guy eluded his career.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0Zijgn-c9w

Here are also 20 other actors, who have been nominated numerous times, but have never taken home an Academy Award.

leonardo di caprio in the wolf on wall street

leonardo di caprio in the wolf on wall street

Leonardo DiCaprio 1994: Nominated for Best Supporting Actor, "What's Eating Gilbert Grape"; 2005: Nominated for Best Actor, "The Aviator"; 2007: Nominated for Best Actor, "Blood Diamond"; 2014: Nominated for "The Wolf of Wall Street"

Johnny Depp 2004: Nominated for Best Actor, "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl"; 2005: Nominated for Best Actor, "Finding Neverland", 2008: Nominated for Best Actor, "Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street"

TOM CRUISE1990: Nominated for Best Actor, "Born on the Fourth of July"; 1997: Nominated for Best Actor, "Jerry Maguire"; 2000: Nominated for Best Supporting Actor, "Magnolia".

JULIANNE MOORE1998: Nominated for Best Supporting Actress, "Boogie Nights";  2000: Nominated for Best Actress, "The End of the Affair"; 2003: Nominated for Best Supporting Actress, "The Hours";  2003: Nominated for Best Actress, "Far From Heaven"

GLENN CLOSE1983: Nominated for Best Supporting Actress, "The World According to Garp"; 1984: Nominated for Best Supporting Actress, "The Big Chill"; 1985: Nominated for Best Supporting Actress, "The Natural"; 1988: Nominated for Best Actress, "Fatal Attraction"; 1989: Nominated for Best Actress, "Dangerous Liasons"; 2012: Nominated for Best Actress, "Albert Nobbs".

JOAQUIN PHOENIX2001: Nominated for Best Supporting Actor, "Gladiator"; 2006: Nominated for Best Actor, "Walk the Line"; 2013: Nominated for Best Actor, "The Master".

EDWARD NORTON1997: Nominated for Best Supporting Actor, "Primal Fear"; 1999: Nominated for Best Actor, "American History X"

ANNETTE BENING1991: Nominated for Best Supporting Actress, "The Grifters";  2000: Nominated for Best Actress, "American Beauty";  2005: Nominated for Best Actress, "Being Julia";  2011: Nominated for Best Actress, "The Kids Are All Right";

ED HARRIS1996: Nominated for Best Supporting Actor, "Apollo 13";  1999: Nominated for Best Supporting Actor, "The Truman Show"; 2001: Nominated for Best Actor, "Pollock";  2003: Nominated for Best Supporting Actor, "The Hours"; lost to Chris Cooper, "Adaptation."

SIGOURNEY WEAVER1987: Nominated for Best Actress, "Aliens"; 1989: Nominated for Best Supporting Actress, "Working Girl"; 1989: Nominated for Best Actress, "Gorillas in the Mist"

HARRISON FORD1985: Nominated for Best Actor, "Witness"

ALBERT FINNEY1964: Nominated for Best Actor, "Tom Jones";  1975: Nominated for Best Actor, "Murder on the Orient Express"; 1984: Nominated for Best Actor, "The Dresser"; 1985: Nominated for Best Actor, "Under the Volcano"; 2001: Nominated for Best Supporting Actor, "Erin Brockovich"; lost to Benicio del Toro, "Traffic"

MICHELLE PFEIFFER  

1989:

Nominated for Best Supporting Actress, "Dangerous Liasons"; 

1990:

Nominated for Best Actress, "The Fabulous Baker Boys"; 

1993:

Nominated for Best Actress, "Love Field"

JOHN TRAVOLTA1978: Nominated for Best Actor, "Saturday Night Fever"; 1995: Nominated for Best Actor, "Pulp Fiction"

GARY OLDMAN2012: Nominated for Best Actor, "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy"

ROBERT DOWNEY, JR.1993: Nominated for Best Actor, "Chaplin"; 2009: Nominated for Best Supporting Actor, "Tropic Thunder"

LIAM NEESON1994: Nominated for Best Actor, "Schindler's List"

WILL SMITH2002: Nominated for Best Actor, "Ali"; 2007: Nominated for Best Actor, "The Pursuit of Happyness"

MARK WAHLBERG2007: Nominated for Best Supporting Actor, "The Departed";  2011: Nominated for Best Picture, "The Fighter" (along with David Hoberman and Todd Lieberman)

RALPH FIENNES1994: Nominated for Best Supporting Actor, "Schindler's List";  1997: Nominated for Best Actor, "The English Patient"

#TBT Clear And Present Danger

images-1 Tom Clancy became one of the best-selling writers of the late 20th and early 21st Centuries, starting with the publication of his 1984 thriller, The Hunt for Red October (1990) by the Naval Institute Press in 1984. The hardcover sold 45,000 copies, an amazing amount for a first novel from a publishing house peddling its first book of fiction, but the paperback -- boosted by a strong recommendation from President Ronald Reagan -- sold two million copies..  In all, he wrote 28 books, mostly fiction but also, military themed non-fiction books. Clancy placed 17 books on the New York Times Best Seller List, many of which hit #1. His oeuvre accounted for sales of 100 million copies, making him one of the all-time most popular writers in history.

Clancy was successful lending his name and ideas to video games, and his video game company Red Storm Entertainment was bought out for $45 million in 2000. Movies adapted from Clancy's works racked up $786.5 million at the box office.  By the time 1994 came along, he was to "go to guy" for having his books adapted for the screen.

Clear and Present Danger starring Harrison Ford, Willem DaFoe and Anne Archer would go on to be the most successful of his films being nominated for two Academy Awards.

Here is a trailer and look at one of Harrison Ford's most popular roles and Tom Clancy's  "Clear and Present Danger"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=900kPg1lomU

Carla Renata

Hey My Fellow Movie Lovers...

A Bison, Virgo, devoted daughter, yoga and spinning enthusiasts, graduate of  the "mecca" - Howard University's School of Communications, former publicist, actress, branding influencer and "doggie mom" to an adorably smart-energetic maltese are just a few of the characteristics that make up the essence of me -- Carla Renata.

Formerly of UBNRAdio.com, where I Co-Hosted "On Air With Tony Sweet", this Fall, I will be hosting a new show for Black Hollywood Live owned by E! Correspondent Maria Menounos  and am a freelance contributor for NPR's Weekend All Things Considered.

I absolutely adore talking about all things cinema and it is my sincere hope that although not every opinion I have will or will not be embraced, know that I am extremely grateful for the opportunity to share!  Enjoy and see you on the red carpet!!!

37 Years Ago Today...STAR WARS

imageThe Star Wars movie opened for the first time 37 years ago today A long time ago, in a theatre far, far away....a kid’s movie opened that would change Hollywood forever.

It’s hard to remember a day when Star Wars wasn’t a towering cultural and marketing event, but on May 25, 1977, it was a smallish movie opening on a Wednesday in just 32 theaters.

There was no premiere.

Theater goers wait in lines in front of the Avco Center Theater in Los Angeles to see "Star Wars" in June 7, 1977.

“Theaters didn't want the movie. We were lucky to get thirty theaters to open it,” Charles Lippincott, former Lucasfilm promotions chief later said of the troubled and much-delayed production.

In New York, you could go see Star Wars at two theaters in Manhattan - the Loews Orpheum on East 86th St. and the Astor Plaza in Times Square - and on Long Island at the Mann Twin South in Hicksville. All three movie palaces have since been demolished.

Tickets were $4. Some viewers remember the box office handing out lapel buttons saying “May the Force be with You.”

Fans sit covered for warmth after waiting in line all night to purchase tickets for the re-release of the movie "Star Wars," Friday morning, Jan. 31, 1997, in San Francisco.

There were rave reviews in many newspapers and Time magazine’s May 30 cover proclaimed it “The Year’s Best Movie,” but the movie began playing in mostly-empty theaters.

However, from the first blast of the film’s magnificient symphonic score and its knockout opening shot - a spaceship zooming directly overhead suddenly dwarfed by the massive spaceship chasing it - the film was an instant sensation.

Whole audiences burst into cheers. The lines began forming that night.

A young George Lucas talks with Anthony Daniels, who plays the robot C-3PO, on the set for the film "Star Wars: A New Hope," in this undated photo.

College freshman Neal Cammy was at the very first showing at the Astor Plaza in Times Square. He came into Manhattan from Canarsie with a buddy and they had a r ow up front to themselves.

“We got there a little late, just as the 20th Century Fox theme was playing. There may have been a handful of people in the theater,” he said.

More than anything, he remembers the soaring music - Star Wars was the first feature film screened in Dolby Stereo - and the “wow” of the Millennium Falcon’s thrilling jump into hyperspace.

Director George Lucas arrives at the benefit premiere of "Star Wars: Episode III-Revenge of the Sith" on Thursday, May 12, 2005, in San Francisco.

“After being stunned by the whole movie, we decided to stay and see it again,” Cammy said. “As we left the theater finally, at 6 or so, we stopped at a record store to buy the soundtrack album. I ended up going to see Star Wars about once a month at the Astor Plaza for the next year.”

Producer Gary Kurtz remembers being on a radio show later that day when an enthusiastic caller said he’d already seen it four times.

“That was opening day. I knew something was happening,” Kurtz told the Los Angeles Times in 2010.

By the weekend, the 32 theaters, upped to 43 by Saturday, had lines around the block.

Star Wars’ official opening weekend take was $1.5 million, about the same as “Smokey And The Bandit,” which opened the same weekend in 300 theaters.

By August, Star Wars was playing at over 1,000 theaters and was on its way to becoming the all-time box office champ.

Author: HELEN KENNEDY .

Carla Renata

Hey My Fellow Movie Lovers...

A Bison, Virgo, devoted daughter, yoga and spinning enthusiasts, graduate of  the "mecca" - Howard University's School of Communications, former publicist, actress, branding influencer and "doggie mom" to an adorably smart-energetic maltese are just a few of the characteristics that make up the essence of me -- Carla Renata.

Formerly of UBNRAdio.com, where I Co-Hosted "On Air With Tony Sweet", this Fall, I will be hosting a new show for Black Hollywood Live owned by E! Correspondent Maria Menounos  and am a freelance contributor for NPR's Weekend All Things Considered.

I absolutely adore talking about all things cinema and it is my sincere hope that although not every opinion I have will or will not be embraced, know that I am extremely grateful for the opportunity to share!  Enjoy and see you on the red carpet!!!